Thursday, September 1, 2016

A Checklist of Essential Items for Hunting Season This Fall


As summer draws to a close, hunters throughout the Northeast are anticipating the fall hunting season. It’s time to stash away the swimsuits and towels in favor of ammo and camo. Before we know it, Thanksgiving will be right around the corner.

But before you start hoisting your tree stand with mouthwatering visions of venison for dinner, you’ll need to prepare. Here, we’ve put together a list of essentials for turkey, deer and elk hunting this fall. 
Depending on your region, this hunting supplies list may vary. We’ve whittled it down to the essentials that may span across multiple types of hunting (except where specifically noted). As a result, we’ve left off equipment like firearms and focused this list more toward the basic gear hunters may or may not forget while packing up the truck. For more ideas or inspiration, you can check out our selection of hunting supplies!

So without further ado, let’s get to the essentials: 

Cell phone – Embrace this modern age (while avoiding the need for smoke signals); don’t forget your phone in case of emergencies (or victory pics at the end of the weekend!).
Your license – This seems like a no-brainer, but your license is an easy thing to forget, and it will really put a damper on your day if you get caught without it.
Pocket knife or multi-tool – It’s always a good idea to keep one on hand for small jobs or quick fixes. 
First-aid kit – Don’t return home with a tragic story because you forgot a first-aid kit. Trust us.
Water – The hydrated hunter is the focused hunter. 
Toilet Paper – Again, don’t return home with a tragic story because you forgot toilet paper. (All jokes aside, be sure to pack a roll… or two.)
Flashlight, lighter, matches – Let there be light! When the sun sets, you’ll be glad you didn’t leave yourself in the dark; plus, those frosty nights are on their way – a fire might be required. 
Catch-all bag with various necessities – It's always a 
good idea to pack a bag with small utensils or toiletries.
Hunting knife, elbow-length plastic gloves, surveyor's flagging tape – For deer and elk hunters, this is just a quick rundown of the tools you’ll need following the kill.
Various calls for locating, attracting and targeting – For turkey hunters, some examples may include locator and diaphragm calls among others. Variables include distance and stage of the hunt. For deer and elk hunters, this will probably be grunt tubes and rattling antlers.
Compass – Unless you were born in the woods where you’re hunting, we highly recommend a compass. Getting lost as the sun goes down is a feeling not unlike Indiana Jones landing in a pit of snakes (read: panic).
Binoculars and range finder – For deer and elk hunters, and maybe some turkey hunters, these are perfect for looking for game from a great distance while perched above the trees.
Scents and lures – Mostly for deer hunters, scents and lures are a key part of the hunt when attracting game.
Rain gear/warm clothes – Anticipate the elements, especially as the season begins to change from summer to fall to, eventually, winter. This most certainly depends on your region, but Northern hunters take notice.
Folding saw – This is a fantastic tool to bring along for a multitude of tasks while in the wild.
Rope – You need it to hang your game; it’s ideal when preparing to transport game home. Be sure it’s sturdy and there’s plenty of it.
Insect repellent – This might apply more to hunters in warmer climates, but nevertheless, take the proper measures to ward off bites and stings that may interfere when you’ve spotted a target. 
Game bags/dry ice – Use these for preserving and protecting your harvest until it’s home and ready for storage. Be sure to purchase the proper sizes depending on your game.
Large coolers for game (foam coolers are perfect) – The final step in traveling home with your bounty is making sure it’s safely contained and chilled.

And if it’s deer you’ll be hunting out there (specifically whitetails), check out David Libby’s book, “Hunting Whitetails From On High” before heading out. Libby writes specifically about dealing with the whitetail issues in Maine where hunting is competitive and deer numbers are low.

Double- and triple-check your list before heading out this season. You can never be too prepared when spending a day, or weekend, in the wild. We wish you the best on your hunt – and feel free to head over to our Hunting Supplies section for some of the best hunting gear you’ll find anywhere!

1 comment: